5 Largest Cat Breeds and What They Weigh


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Domestic cats come in a variety of shapes and sized from the teeny tiny to extra large. If you’re looking for the largest cat breeds, we have the list for you.

Here are the 5 largest cat breeds and what they weigh:

BreedLengthWeight
Maine Coon40 inches15-25 pounds
Savannah20-22 inches15-25 pounds
Ragdoll17-21 inches15-20 pounds
Ragamuffin15-20 inches12-20 pounds
Norwegian Forest12-18 inches12-16 pounds

In this article, we will break down what the largest cat breeds are, as well as what factors go into a cat being large and small.

How Big Are Cats?

child holding a black fluffy cat

While several factors go into determining a healthy weight for any individual cat, most cats are around 10 pounds, with some being much smaller and some being much larger. (source)

Generally, a full-grown cat will not weigh less than 5 pounds and not more than 25 pounds, but if you put that 5-pound cat next to that 25-pound cat, you would be astonished.

The Largest Domestic Cat Breeds

Before we dive into the list of the largest domestic cat breeds, it is important to take a few things into account:

  • Male cats tend to be larger and heavier than female cats. If you’re interested in bringing a large cat into your home, it is better to select a male.
  • Weight is not a good indicator of cat size, especially in domesticated cats that tend toward obesity. For example, according to the Guinness World Records, the heaviest cat recorded was Himmy, a basic tabby who weighed over 46 pounds, who died in 1986. 

However, Guinness World Records no longer has a title for the largest domestic cat, so that record may have been surpassed.

  • Size and weight of a cat depend heavily on parentage and upbringing. A kitten that is fed a high-quality diet and comes from a line of larger than average ancestors will grow bigger.
  • Neutered cats will not experience stunted growth, but they tend to be heavier. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11787153)

So, take these numbers with a grain of salt. A healthy weight for any particular cat will vary depending on the size, build, and sex of your pet and any cat can be unhealthily large if Himmy is any indication.

#1 Maine Coon: 25 pounds

maine coon cat

Maine Coon cats are renowned for their size, which is only amplified by their shaggy, uneven coat, and they are hands down, the largest domestic cat breed in the world.

Maine Coon cats generally weigh between 15 and 25 pounds and reach a length of 45 inches  (source), but they can certainly grow to be larger. 

  • The current Guinness World Record holder for the longest domestic cat (living) is a Maine Coon cat named Barivel, who is 3 feet and 11.2 inches long. 
  • The title for the longest domestic cat ever also goes to a Maine Coon, Stewie, who was over 4 feet long. These cats are bigger than most 5-year-olds! (source)

So, if you’re looking for a large breed, Maine Coon cats are the way to go! You may even end up with the next world record holder.

#2 Savannah Cat: 25 pounds

savannah cat

The Savannah cat is a relatively new breed to the domestic feline world. The first one (known at least) was born in 1986 and is a mix of a domestic short hair and an African Sevral, which is a wild cat a bit bigger than your average domestic cat. (source)

The Savannah cat became popular as a pet very quickly for its beautiful spotted coat and natural grace. Many people think these cats are heavier than they are because of their size.

They are long and tall cats with a sleek, trim physique.  They generally weigh around 15 to 25 pounds and are around 20-22 inches long (source).

There is some debate as to whether Savannah cats should be considered domesticated, as their ancestry is so closely related to a non-domesticated feline.

Most agree that the cat is friendly, affectionate, and easily trainable. In fact, they’ve been compared to dogs in temperament.

Savannah Cat Size by Generation

Although Savannah cats can be quite large, depending on the generation that you have, they may not be as large as you would like. Here is a chart of measurements taken by the Savannah Cat Association of different generations of Savannah Cats.

GenerationFemale Savannah CatMale Savannah Cat
F119 pounds22.9 pounds
F213 pounds16 pounds
F312 pounds15 pounds
(source)

These numbers are based on a select group of Savannah cats and so may be somewhat limited, but the trend cannot be denied.

The F1 generation, or the first generation, is clearly substantially larger than later generations, and the further you get away from the first generation, the smaller the cats get with F6s averaging 13 pounds.

If you’re looking into getting an F1 generation, you better be willing to pay as it will likely cost you well over $20,000 (source).

#3 Ragdoll: 20 pounds

ragdoll cat

The Ragdoll is a beautiful semi-longhaired cat with darker markings at the ears and around the eyes. These cats are well known for being especially affectionate companions, but they are also on the bigger side.

Adult Ragdoll cats will range in weight from 15 to 20 pounds (source). They aren’t the heaviest cat around, but they are certainly a top contender. They are also 17 to 21 inches in length (source).

#4 Ragamuffin: 20 pounds

ragamuffin cat

Ragamuffins have a gentle and loving personality, making them great companions for families or seniors. When it comes to size, they are about the same size as a Ragdoll, although their thick coat may make them appear larger.

In general, you can expect Ragamuffin to weigh between 15 and 20 pounds once they fully mature (source). They tend to be between 15 and 20 inches in length (source). 

# 5 Norwegian Forest: 16 pounds

Just looking at pictures, it would be easy to mistake the Norwegian Forest cat for a Maine Coon cat. They both have a distinct look with a shaggy coat and a full face, but if you were looking at them in person, there would be a clear size difference with the Maine Coon cat being by far the larger.

The Norwegian Forest cat will typically top out between 12-16 pounds, but there are, of course, outliers (source). They range from 12-18 inches in length (source).

They may not be the largest or heaviest cat on this list, but they are undeniably cute.

Other Medium-Large Cat Breeds

Once you hit the 15-pound mark, you’ll find that most cats can easily hit this number and still not be considered obese. Other cats that will be a similar size to the Norwegian Forest include:

  • American Bobtail
  • Siberian
  • Bengal
  • Pixiebob
  • Ocicat

These are just some examples of breeds with males that tend to reach about 15 pounds or more, but remember, every cat is different. (source)

Largest Cats in the Wild

siberian tiger

Curious about how our domestic felines compare to big cats? Well, they can’t hold a flame to big cats.

  • The largest big cat out there is the liger, which is the result of breeding a male lion and a female tiger. The largest of these weights over 900 pounds! (source)
  • But this isn’t far off from the Siberian Tiger, which weighs 700 pounds.
  • But even small cats in the wild are larger than most domesticated cat breeds. The Serval, for example, is a svelte 40 pounds.(source

In Conclusion

The largest cat breed is the ultra-fluffy main coon cat, which reaches lengths well past three feet and can easily hit 25 pounds. Beyond breed, nutrition as a kitten, genetics, and sex will play important roles in the size of your feline. If you’re looking for the biggest cat you can find, be sure to work with a knowledgeable and reputable breeder with parent cats that are on the larger side and choose a male cat over a female.

April

I'm an avid animal lover, former veterinary assistant, and blogger. My undergraduate work included a pre-veterinary curriculum and some graduate work along those lines as well from Cal Poly in Pomona, CA (GO BRONCOS!). These days I blog about all sorts of animal-related topics. Many I have or currently personally own, some I don't but am just interested in. Nothing in this blog should be construed as veterinary advice. I am a 100% advocate that if you think something is wrong with your pet, take it to a vet.

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